Pyramides in Teotihuacán & Mexico City

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The Pyramid of the Sun and the Pyramid of the Moon

Our first big archaeological ruins in Teotihuacán, Mexico. The name of the site, which means “place of the gods,” comes from the Aztecs, one of Mexico’s largest and most impressive archaeological sites. The principal road running through the center of Teotihuacan, called the Avenue of the Dead, is almost a mile and a half long, and about 130 feet wide. Many buildings surround the Avenue of the Dead. The two dominating structures, The Pyramid of the Sun and the Pyramid of the Moon, both pyramids can be climbed. And we climbed them both. The Pyramid of the Sun is the third highest in the world and just a few meters shorter than the famous Pyramid Giza found in Egypt. At this altitude a challenging but worthwhile climb. From the top you can appreciate the full extent of the site and the view is breathtaking.

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The Pyramid of the Sun, Teotihuacan’s most impressive structure towering more than 200 feet in height

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The view from the Pyramid of the Sun

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Pyramid of the Moon – the next one to climb…

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View of the Avenue of the Dead and the Pyramid of the Sun, from the Pyramid of the Moon

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pretty steep up….

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…and down….

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airplane pose on Pyramid of the Moon…

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Temple of Quetzalcoatl – Feathered Serpent Pyramid

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Temple of Quetzalcoatl

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We met Angelika & Simon (www.thirdgear.ch) from Switzerland at the Teotihuacan Trailer Park. Thanks for your hospitality – the Nespresso coffee was amazing and thank you also for all the travel tips

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not towing but pushing?!

Mexico City – the country’s largest city at 2,240 metres (7,350 ft)

a few facts about Mexico City:

  • officially known as México, D. F., or simply DF is the Federal District (Distrito Federal), capital of Mexico and seat of the federal powers of Mexico
  • located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus at the center of Mexico, at an altitude of 2,240 metres (7,350 ft).
  • The city consists of 16 boroughs and more than 300 neighbourhoods
  • Mexico City is the country’s largest city as well as its most important political, cultural, educational and financial center
  • the largest metropolitan area in the western hemisphere
  • the largest Spanish-speaking city in the world

Because of crazy city traffic, parking issues and the “Hoy No Circula” Driving Restrictions, we decided it’s best to leave our car at the Teotihuacán Trailer Park and take the bus / metro to visit Mexico City. We caught a bus from San Juan Teotihuacán which takes about 45 min. to reach the northern metro station. From there the great metro system will take you almost anywhere across the city. We checked into the Mexico City Hostel and wandered around the Zócalo (Centro Historico) where we admired the beautiful historic buildings like: the Plaza de la Constitucion or Zócalo, the National Palace, Metropolitan Cathedral, Templo Mayor, Palace of Fine Arts and Alameda Park. To explore also neighborhoods outside the historic center we decided to hop on the TURIBUS. We saw a lot but 3.5 hours was a bit too much and towards the end we were really bored.

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the massive Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral

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Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral

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Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral

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the National Palace

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Downtown with the tower “Torre Latinoamericana” (height 183 m or 597 ft; 45 stories)

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Palacio de Bellas Artes

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Tour with the “TURIBUS”

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group of indiginous dancers & drummers

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a huge panaderia =bakery

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The military had their yearly exhibition at the zocalo. Huge crowd waiting in line

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the Mexican military is driving also a Mercedes G-Wagon

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